Continued: Social Justice Quiz 2008

Authored by Bill Quigley, a human rights lawyer and law professor at Loyola University New Orleans. Questions #1-7 are found on The Peace Tree, Sunday, September 14.
Click below for the answers to (and documentation of) today's segment of the quiz.

8. How many people in the world do not have electricity?

9. People in the US consume 42 kilograms of meat per person per year.
How much meat and grain do people in India and China eat?

10. How many cars does China have for every 1000 drivers? India? The U.S.?

11. How much grain is needed to fill a SUV tank with ethanol?

12. According to the Wall Street Journal, the richest 1% of Americans earns what percent of the nation's adjusted gross income?
A) 5%, B) 10%, C) 15%, D)20%

Expand the post +/-

8. World-wide, 1.6 billion people do not have electricity. 2.5 billion people use wood, charcoal or animal dung for cooking.
United Nations Human Development Report 2007/2008, pages 44-45.

9. People in the US lead the world in meat consumption at 42 kg per person per year compared to 1.6 kg in India and 5.9 kg in China.
People in the US consume five times the grain (wheat, rice, rye, barley, etc.) as people in India, three times as much as people in China, and twice as much as people in Europe.
"THE BLAME GAME: Who is behind the world food price crisis," Oakland Institute, July 2008.

10. China has 9 cars for every 1000 drivers. India has 11 cars for every 1000 drivers. The US has 1114 cars for every 1000 drivers.
Iain Carson and Vijay V. Vaitheeswaran, Zoom: The Global Race to Fuel the Car of the Future (2007).

11. The grain needed to fill up a SUV tank with ethanol could feed a hungry person for a year. Lester Brown,, August 16, 2006

12. D: "According to the figures, the richest 1% reported 22% of the nation's total adjusted gross income in 2006. That is up from 21.2% a year earlier, and is the highest in the 19 years that the IRS has kept strictly comparable figures. The 1988 level was 15.2%. Earlier IRS data show the last year the share of income belonging to the top 1% was at such a high level as it was in 2006 was in 1929, but changes in measuring income make a precise comparison difficult."
Jesse Drucker, "Richest Americans See Their Income Share Grow," Wall Street Journal,
July 23, 2008, page A3.

Cross Posted on Border Explorer.
Concluding segment of Social Justice Quiz 2008 next Sunday morning.


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